Green Practices

Sustainably Grown Teak PlantationTERRA. It’s all in the name. Hard to escape a full on environmental movement when your name means EARTH. So don’t be too surprised to find out Terra Patio has a long and proud history in pursuit of green goals.

Yes, we’re in business. But it’s also about growing a sustainable company while protecting our natural resources.

We understand it’s about promoting greater environmental responsibility and developing eco-friendly products and manufacturing processes.

So when it comes to teak, we work hard to influence the impact we have on the environment specifically in regard to forest conservation and management. Terra Patio has made it our company’s policy to source our teak wood from well managed, certified forests. We purchase wood only from Perum Perhutani, the government-managed plantation that promotes biodiversity and the livelihoods of the people that depend on them. And, because it is the only source in our supply chain for wood base material, we have 100% transparency; we know exactly where all our lumber comes from for every component of our furniture; from the forest-floor to retail floor.

Historically, the Dutch started teak plantations in Indonesia, perhaps, some 200 years ago and the government of Indonesia have since taken over and developed it to what is today to become what is probably the world’s largest teak plantations managing nearly 5 million acres of sustainable forests. Through careful and responsible forest management, trees are constantly being planted at a rate that far exceeds those being felled.

We are proud of the work that Perum Perhutani has done not only to protect old growth forests but also in their work to find ways to support local sustainable farmers. Because teak is, by far, a slow growing crop, the managed system incorporates agro-forestry for the locals to farm other crops between the alleys or rows of planted teak trees, throughout the life cycle of the trees. This process provides the locals additional economic avenue along with the industry brought about by the teak enterprise to the local economy. All in all, it’s a good start. We all need to do more. Work harder and find creative solutions to live and let live. That’s our message and the direction we are heading.